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Anatomy for the FRCA

Anatomy for the FRCA BookAnatomy questions are asked in all parts of the FRCA examinations, and for many trainees it is a particularly daunting part of the exams.

 
Anatomy for the FRCA is a one day, high quality course designed to best prepare candidates for the Primary and Final FRCA.  You will receive focused teaching on specific areas relevant to anaesthesia, using prosections and models.  Pre-course written questions are issued, then reviewed on the day followed by an OSCE and SOEs.  Sonoanatomy for regional anaethesia is also reviewed in a live scanning session. It is held in the Anatomy Department in St Andrews University School of Medicine and delivered by a faculty of experienced anaesthetists and anatomists. Next course date: 20 March 2020.
 
 
A copy of the book, Anatomy for the FRCA, is included in the price (£24.99 from CUP below). This is a comprehensive, exam-orientated clinical anatomy book for anaesthetists preparing for the FRCA. It covers all body regions, relating underlying anatomy to practical procedures and anatomical principles, spanning the breadth of the curriculum and comprising exam-style questions.

The text is highly illustrated in full colour with ultrasound images, reproducible schematics and photographs of cadaveric material and models. This is the first anatomy book specifically orientated for the FRCA exam, making it an essential resource for anaesthetists preparing for all parts of the FRCA examination.

 

 

 

We've read the book at RAUK and we thought Anatomy for the FRCA has an engaging, accurate and accessible approach to anatomical revision.  The content for areas specific to regional anaesthesia is well presented, combining clearly labelled diagrams of cadaver dissections alongside ultrasound cross-sectional images and succinct clinical information relevant to each block. We highly recommend this for those studying for the FRCA or wanting to brush up on the foundational knowledge or regional anaesthesia.